Author Archives: Cyndi Casemier

Tuscan Bean Soup

  Tuscan Bean Soup Ingredients: 3 tablespoons olive oil 2 medium carrots, thickly sliced 1 large onion, coarsely chopped 1 stalk celery, coarsely chopped 1 clove garlic, finely chopped 3 sprigs fresh oregano 1/4 teaspoon salt Black pepper, to taste 2 cans (15 ounces each) cannellini beans or other small white beans, drained and rinsed 5 cups chicken stock or vegetable stock 4 cups baby kale or baby spinach, stems removed if tough 1 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano, for garnish Olive oil, to serve Extra grated Parmesan, to serve Directions: Cook the vegetables: In a soup pot, heat the olive oil. When it is hot, add the carrots, onion, celery, garlic, fresh oregano sprigs, salt, and pepper. Cook, stirring often, for 10 minutes until the vegetables look softened and the onions are turning translucent. Prepare the beans: On a plate, mash 1/2 cup of the beans with a fork or potato masher. Add them to the vegetables in the pot. Cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Simmer the soup: Add the remaining beans to the pot and stir well. Stir in the chicken stock and bring to a boil. Lower the heat, partially cover with the lid placed askew, and simmer for 20 minutes, or until the carrots are tender and the liquid is flavorful. Discard the oregano sprigs; the leaves will have fallen into the soup. Add additional salt and pepper to taste. While the soup simmers: Sprinkle bowls with olive oil and cheese. Add the greens to the soup: Add the kale or spinach to the pot and simmering for another 2 minutes, or just until the greens wilt. Serve the soup: Ladle the soup into bowls, sprinkle with oregano and more olive oil, if you like, and serve with Parmesan toasts and extra Parmesan for sprinkling. The best bean soups have a lived-in quality, as if they have been simmering on the back burner for hours, just waiting for you. You can achieve this by cooking the dried beans from scratch, of course. Or you can skip the long simmer and pop open a can! Bean soups have the distinct advantage of tasting terrific either way. Today’s soup uses canned beans to make a 30-minute meal that tastes like it took all day. When you start this soup, sauté vegetables first to give the soup lots of flavor. Let carrots, onion, and celery cook with sprigs of oregano, then stir in the beans and chicken stock. To make sure your soup has that appealing “simmered all day” quality when using canned beans, just mash some of the beans before they go into the pot. This will give your soup the slightly distressed texture that a good bean soup should have. Simmer the soup briefly, then add baby kale or spinach for their pretty green color and texture. Parmesan toasts are an easy side dish to make while the soup is simmering and they give your dinner plenty of crunch. Sprinkle the bowls with olive oil and more Parmesan. You’re done in less than half an hour, but your soup will taste like an afternoon’s effort. Read more: http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/easy_tuscan_bean_soup/#ixzz53KyjAEMx


So, what makes a great pot (ceramic, that is)?

Great Form and Design by West Michigan Ceramic Artists and more

Ceramic artists (potters) are a hard working group of people. They have a commitment to making the best pots possible that reflect their personal story using clay. Pots can be very straightforward like a human body: functional, beautiful and strong. Ceramic work can also be complicated, abstract, and sculptural. One of the things that I love about clay is that it connects us to others. It is a basic material that can be used for many things.   As humans, we have used it for thousands of years to assist us in our daily lives. Tony Clennell I believe that we are all creative. You do creative things all day long:  what you are wearing; how you cook your food; how you mow your yard; and more.  Being creative can heal and connect us to something deeper than ourselves. It makes our lives richer. Using handmade pottery does enrich your life connecting you to a larger world; reminding us to take just a few minutes to consider the story of this pot; and to breathe.   So what makes a good pot?   “The best of pots through the ages have a quality of timelessness about them that transcends chronological and cultural boundaries. The essence of form, the movement of a brush, the quality of surface. Pottery is neither painting nor sculpture, although it has elements of both.” (excerpt from Robin’s Hopper preface in his book, Functional Pottery) Robin Hopper There are several things to consider, when looking at a piece of functional pottery: Proper use of the selected clay body and glazes. Does the pot function well for the use intended? The overall design of the pot. Which clay body and glaze is best? Any clay body – earthenware, stoneware, porcelain – can be used to make Fantastic Interesting Pottery Forms. IF the maker applies correctly formulated glazes and then fires the work correctly. What I mean by this is: Earthenware is typically what we call low fired. We have one artist – Michael Kifer who uses this type of clay. It allows him to get unusual colors and textures. Think Bright Reds, Blues, Greens, Yellows. Michael’s pottery can go in the dishwasher. I wouldn’t put it in the microwave for more than 40 seconds. Raku – is not earthenware. It is a type of firing. Typically these clay artists use groggy clay to handle the contraction and expansion of clay that occurs during a raku kiln firing. Four artists at C2C creating raku work: Tonya Rund, Scott Berman, Mike Bryant, and Diane Niehof. Stoneware – is a mix of different chemicals that help the clay be very forgiving when working with it. It is great for planters, dishes, serving pieces, vases, etc. We have several potters who work in it either throwing on the potter’s wheel or hand building to make their work. Artists at C2C who work in stoneware are: Mike Taylor, Julie Devers, Polly Wellford, Richard Aerni, Jerri Puerner, Jacob Koster, Cory McCrory, and Mary Kuilema. In the 1700’s, porcelain was considered “white gold” and history told us that in those days it caused greed and theft. Bernard Leach, a British potter, was one of the first artists to create a fairly reliable porcelain clay for ceramic artists. At C2C, Marion Angelica, Brooks Bouwkamp, Jerri Puerner, and myself use porcelain. Does the pot function well for the intended use? When you pick up a mug, do your fingers fit well in the handle? (This is a personal preference.) If you pick up a bowl, does the bowl feel balanced, not bottom heavy. If you run your fingers up from the inside of the bowl to the rim are the walls of it an even thickness?   A casserole (lidded and un-lidded) can be very lovely for display and use. You should ask whether it can go in the oven (into a hot or cold one) or be used just for serving food. Does the lid fit comfortably on the base? Is the galley where the lid sits substantial enough to handle use? Or will you need to be careful when replacing the lid? If you are selecting a teapot; do you collect or will you use it? Many teapots are created just for pleasure; others for use. Does the teapot pour well or dribble? When you are pouring liquid from it, does the pot feel balanced? Remember you will have hot liquid inside of it. You don’t want your hands to be touching the body of the teapot. Can you pour the hot liquid easily? What makes a good pot? The overall design. “Trust your gut when looking at a painting or a piece of pottery.” Intuitively, we all know whether a piece of art “works”.  When considering pottery, we use terms like: shoulder, belly, lip, neck, and foot. We look at the form’s proportions. How does the piece feel in your hands? Will you be picking it up often? Is the form graceful?  Did the potter pay attention to the small details like the rim and foot of the pot?  Does the surface decoration work with the form?  Are the decorations appropriate, interesting, and well constructed?   A famous Greek philosopher-mathematician named Eudoxus is said to have carried a walking stick with him. He would ask friends to visually divide the stick into two parts at whatever point they sensed it to be most pleasing. Much to his satisfaction, the majority of people chose a point close to the same place on the stick. From this he deduced that most people are spontaneously drawn to the same ratios. The Golden Mean or Rule is also fascinating in that the living world follows this natural law creating pleasing forms and relationships. (excerpt from Functional Pottery by Robin Hopper). This is what I mean when I say to a client “Trust your gut when looking at a painting or a piece of pottery.”            


Come visit us in lovely downtown Grand Haven.

2013CyndiBlog

Handmade Art & Gifts

104 Washington Street
Grand Haven, MI 49417
Cyndi Casemier, Owner
616-935-7337

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